Using a socially-engaged arts approach to exploring how diverse socio-cultural groups accessed, valued, engaged with and benefited from an urban treescape during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Goodenough, Alice ORCID: 0000-0003-0862-2894, Urquhart, Julie ORCID: 0000-0001-5000-4630, Morrison, K, Black, J.E., Courtney, Paul ORCID: 0000-0002-5683-8502 and Potter, Clive (2024) Using a socially-engaged arts approach to exploring how diverse socio-cultural groups accessed, valued, engaged with and benefited from an urban treescape during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 98. art: 128398. doi:10.1016/j.ufug.2024.128398 (In Press)

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14190 Goodenough, Urquhart, Morrison, Black, Courtney, Potter (2024) Using a socially-engaged arts approach to exploring how diverse socio-cultural groups accessed, valued, engaged with and benefited from an urban trees.pdf - Published Version
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Abstract

This paper presents a socially-engaged arts approach to exploring the variety and specificity of cultural benefits urban park-users associated with its treescape during the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on the cultural ecosystem services framework, cultural benefits are understood in terms of positive impacts to ‘experiences’ (our relational interactions with the environment), ‘capabilities’ (our knowledge and abilities in relation to environmental interaction) and ‘identities’ (our perceptions of our relationship with the environment). The research captured evidence of a broad range of people’s interactions with the human and non-human world, whilst opening up an inclusive space for respondents to reflect on and share feelings about the significance of these experiences. The methods employed attracted a range of ‘quieter voices’ to participate, particularly more vulnerable park-users. They also attended to the multiple levels at which people connected with treescapes during this time, from less conscious material engagements to more emotionally and culturally driven transactions. This case study research highlights the important role of the park’s treescape in supporting people to feel better during the COVID-19 crisis and their cultural associations and ties to it. However, it also explores feelings of concern for and perceived lack of influence over this valued resource as potentially disbenefiting wellbeing. It identifies experiences of environmental anxiety, emerging from a lack of certainty over and agency within urban green spaces and treescapes and the benefits they can provide. It concludes that management of treescapes and greenspaces should be sensitive to impacts on environmental emotion.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Socially-engaged art; Urban greenspace; Marginalised groups; COVID-19; Cultural ecosystem services; Wellbeing; Eco-anxiety
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human geography. Human ecology. Anthropogeography
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV191.2 Outdoor Life. Outdoor recreation.
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
N Fine Arts > NX Arts in general
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > Countryside and Community Research Institute
Depositing User: Harry Batchelor
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2024 10:05
Last Modified: 11 Jul 2024 12:23
URI: https://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/14190

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