Avatars with child sexual abuse (vs. no abuse) scenarios elicit different emotional reactions

Segal, Aleksandr, Pompedda, Francesco ORCID: 0000-0001-9253-0049, Haginoya, Shumpei, Kaniušonytė, Goda and Santtila, Pekka (2022) Avatars with child sexual abuse (vs. no abuse) scenarios elicit different emotional reactions. Psychology, Crime and Law. pp. 1-21. doi:10.1080/1068316X.2022.2082422 (In Press)

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Abstract

Simulated avatar interview training has been proven to be effective in improving child sexual abuse interview quality. However, the topic of perceived realism of the avatars and whether they cause emotional reactions has not been previously investigated. Such reactions could affect both learning from the interview simulations as well as how actual interviews are conducted. We wanted to understand whether participants perceive allegedly sexually abused child avatars as realistic and how they emotionally respond to avatars revealing they were actually abused vs. not-abused. Psychology students and recent graduates (N = 30, Mage = 27.9 years) watched eight avatars (four boys, four girls, four with a CSA and four with a no-CSA scenario) providing a series of details about what had happened. Before and after observing each avatar, the participants’ emotional reactions and perceived realness of the avatars were measured. Also, during each observation, the participant’s facial expressions were recorded. The participants self-reported more negative (anger, sadness, disgust) and more positive (relief) emotions to confirmed CSA and disconfirmed CSA scenarios, respectively, while results for facially expressed emotions were less clear. Higher general emotionality related to CSA and higher perceived realness of the avatars made the differences generally stronger.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Additional Information: This project has received funding from European Regional Development Fund (project No 01.2.2-LMT-K-718-03-0067)under grant agreement with the Research Council of Lithuania (LMTLT).
Uncontrolled Keywords: Child sexual abuse; (CSA)emotional reactions; simulation training; investigative interviewing
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Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology. > HV6001 Criminology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology. > HV6001 Criminology > HV6250 Victims of Crimes. Victimology
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Education and Science
Research Priority Areas: Culture, Continuity, and Transformation
Depositing User: Anne Pengelly
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2022 09:25
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2023 15:40
URI: https://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/11264

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