The need for eccentric speed: A narrative review of the effects of accelerated eccentric actions during resistance-based training

Handford, Matthew J, Bright, Tommy E, Mundy, Peter, Lake, Jason, Theis, Nicola ORCID: 0000-0002-0775-1355 and Hughes, Jonathan ORCID: 0000-0002-9905-8055 (2022) The need for eccentric speed: A narrative review of the effects of accelerated eccentric actions during resistance-based training. Sports Medicine. doi:10.1007/s40279-022-01686-z (In Press)

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Abstract

Eccentric training, as a method to enhance athletic performance, is a topic of increasing interest to both practitioners and researchers. However, there is limited data regarding the effects of performing eccentric actions of an exercise at increased velocities. This narrative review aimed to provide greater clarity for eccentric methods and classification with regard to temporal phases of exercises. To achieve the object of the review, key terms were searched using PubMed, SPORTDiscus and Google Scholar databases between March and April 2021 within the years of 1950-2021.Search terms included: (‘fast eccentric’), (‘fast velocity eccentric’), (‘dynamic eccentric’), (‘accentuated eccentric loading’), (‘isokinetic eccentric’), analysing both the acute and chronic effects of accelerated eccentric training on human participants. Of the 26 studies which met inclusion criteria, it was identified that completing eccentric tempos of <2s can increase subsequent concentric one repetition maximum performance, velocity, and power, compared to >4s tempos. Durations of >4s tempo increase time under tension (TUT); whilst reduced tempos allow for greater volume to be completed. Greater TUT leads to larger accumulation of blood lactate, growth hormone and testosterone, when volume is matched to that of the reduced tempos. Overall, evidence supports <2s duration eccentric actions to improve subsequent concentric performance. There is no clear difference between using eccentric tempos of 2–6s if the aim is to increase hypertrophic response and strength. Future research should analyse performing eccentric actions at greater velocities or reduced time durations to determine more factors such as strength response. Tempo studies should aim to complete the same TUT for protocols to determine measures for hypertrophic response.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Eccentric training; Enhanced athletic performance
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports > GV0711 Coaching
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports > GV0712 Athletic contests. Sports events
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
Q Science > QP Physiology
Q Science > QP Physiology > QP301.H75 Physiology. Sport
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Sport and Exercise > Applied Sport & Exercise Sciences
Research Priority Areas: Health, Life Sciences, Sport and Wellbeing
Depositing User: Jonathan Hughes
Date Deposited: 12 May 2022 09:53
Last Modified: 12 May 2022 14:30
URI: https://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/10897

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