Achieving 100% pass rate and NSS feedback for a module: How we did it

Hill, Jennifer ORCID: 0000-0002-0682-783X and West, Harry (2017) Achieving 100% pass rate and NSS feedback for a module: How we did it. In: UWE Teaching & Learning Conference, 20 JUne 2017, Bristol. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Assessment exercises a major influence on student learning and achievement (Boud 2007). Yet QAA reviews and pedagogic literature identify assessment practices as one of the weakest features of Higher Education (Rust et al. 2005). In terms of the student learning experience the feedback process following assessment is the least satisfactory element. This is exemplified in consistently low satisfaction scores for assessment and feedback in National Student Surveys (NSS), where most concern surrounds the timeliness, quality and effectiveness of feedback. The research presented here is based on the premise that feedback should occupy a central position within a dialogic approach to learning, teaching and assessment (Alexander 2004). We adopt a qualitative case study approach, undertaking semi-structured interviews with students from two consecutive cohorts who have undertaken dialogic feed-forward coursework on a second year undergraduate physical geography module at UWE. The assessment consists of submitting a considered draft of a coursework essay, which is discussed and evaluated face-to-face with the course tutor before a self-reflective piece is written about the assessment process and a final essay is submitted for formal grading. Using thematic analysis of transcripts we explore student perspectives of the assessment process. We test the social constructivist theory that if academic staff and students discuss feedback together students might negotiate meaning and learn to actively reflect upon feedback, developing their capacity to translate key content and ‘feeding forward’ this learning (Brown 2007; Nicol 2010). We present evidence that this process asserts a positive influence on the student learning experience in a number of inter-related cognitive and affective ways, in supporting student performance/achievement, and in enhancing NSS and TEF metrics related to feedback (Higgins et al. 2001, Sutton 2009). We finish by presenting a model of good practice for dialogic feed-forward assessment that can guide both module and programme planning and delivery.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: 100% pass rate; NSS feedback; Module
Related URLs:
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Divisions: Professional Services > Academic Development Unit
Research Priority Areas: Environmental Dynamics & Governance
Depositing User: Marta Kemp
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2020 14:21
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2020 14:36
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/7897

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