Changes in sprint and jump performance following traditional, plyometric and combined resistance training in male youth pre- and post-peak height velocity

Lloyd, Rhodri S. and Radnor, John M. and De Ste Croix, Mark B and Cronin, John B and Oliver, Jon L (2016) Changes in sprint and jump performance following traditional, plyometric and combined resistance training in male youth pre- and post-peak height velocity. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 30 (5). pp. 1239-1247. ISSN 1064-8011

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 6-week training interventions utilizing different modes of resistance (traditional strength, plyometric and combined training) on sprinting and jumping performance in boys pre- and post-peak height velocity (PHV). Eighty school-age boys were categorized into two maturity groups (pre- or post-PHV) and then randomly assigned to 1) plyometric training, 2) traditional strength training, 3) combined training, or 4) a control group. Experimental groups participated in twice-weekly training programmes for 6-weeks. Acceleration, maximal running velocity, squat jump height and reactive strength index data were collected pre- and post-intervention. All training groups made significant gains in measures of sprinting and jumping irrespective of the mode of resistance training and maturity. Plyometric training elicited the greatest gains across all performance variables in pre-PHV children, whereas combined training was the most effective in eliciting change in all performance variables for the post-PHV cohort. Statistical analysis indicated that plyometric training produced greater changes in squat jump and acceleration performance in the pre-PHV group compared to the post-PHV cohort. All other training responses between pre- and post-PHV cohorts were not significant and not clinically meaningful. The study indicates that plyometric training might be more effective in eliciting short-term gains in jumping and sprinting in boys that are pre-PHV, whereas those that are post-PHV may benefit from the additive stimulus of combined training.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Lloyd, Rhodri S. and Radnor, John M. and De Ste Croix, Mark B and Cronin, John B and Oliver, Jon L (2016) Changes in sprint and jump performance following traditional, plyometric and combined resistance training in male youth pre- and post-peak height velocity. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 30 (5). pp. 1239-1247.
Uncontrolled Keywords: strength training; plyometric training; combined training; children; adolescents
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports > GV1060 Track and field athletics
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Sport & Exercise > Sport and Exercise
Research Priority Areas: Sport, Exercise, Health & Wellbeing
Depositing User: Anne Pengelly
Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2015 13:53
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2016 09:53
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/2725

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