Looking forward through the past: identification of 50 priority research questions in palaeoecology

Seddon, Alistair W. R. and Mackay, Anson W. and Baker, Ambroise G. and Birks, H. John B. and Breman, Elinor and Buck, Caitlin E. and Ellis, Erle C. and Froyd, Cynthia A. and Gill, Jacquelyn L. and Gillson, Lindsey and Johnson, Edward A. and Jones, Vivienne J. and Juggins, Stephen and Macias-Fauria, Marc and Mills, Keely and Morris, Jesse L. and Nogués-Bravo, David and Punyasena, Surangi W. and Roland, Thomas P. and Tanentzap, Andrew J. and Willis, Kathy J. and Aberhan, Martin and van Asperen, Eline N. and Austin, William E. N. and Battarbee, Rick W. and Bhagwat, Shonil and Belanger, Christina L. and Bennett, Keith D. and Birks, Hilary H. and Bronk Ramsey, Christopher and Brooks, Stephen J. and de Bruyn, Mark and Butler, Paul G. and Chambers, Frank M and Clarke, Stewart J. and Davies, Althea L. and Dearing, John A. and Ezard, Thomas H. G. and Feurdean, Angelica and Flower, Roger J. and Gell, Peter and Hausmann, Sonja and Hogan, Erika J. and Hopkins, Melanie J. and Jeffers, Elizabeth S. and Korhola, Atte A. and Marchant, Robert and Kiefer, Thorsten and Lamentowicz, Mariusz and Larocque-Tobler, Isabelle and López-Merino, Lourdes and Liow, Lee H. and McGowan, Suzanne and Miller, Joshua H. and Montoya, Encarni and Morton, Oliver and Nogué, Sandra and Onoufriou, Chloe and Boush, Lisa P. and Rodriguez-Sanchez, Francisco and Rose, Neil L. and Sayer, Carl D. and Shaw, Helen E. and Payne, Richard and Simpson, Gavin and Sohar, Kadri and Whitehouse, Nicki J. and Williams, John W. and Witkowski, Andrzej and McGlone, Matt (2014) Looking forward through the past: identification of 50 priority research questions in palaeoecology. Journal of Ecology, 102 (1). pp. 256-267. ISSN 00220477

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Abstract

Sediment coring on Lake Baikal, Russia. Palaeoecological information (i.e. the biological and geochemical remains preserved in lake sediments) provide insights into ecological processes and environmental change occurring over decades to millions of years. Our exercise targeted future research areas for palaeoecology by identifying 50 priority questions.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Palaeoecology, Russia; Anthropocene, biodiversity, conservation, ecology and evolution, human–environment interactions, long-term ecology, palaeoecology and land-use history, research priorities, Palaeo50
Related URLs:
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Natural & Social Sciences > Environmental Sciences
Research Priority Areas: Environmental Dynamics & Governance
Depositing User: Susan Turner
Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2015 11:49
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2017 15:08
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/2503

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