Grazing intensity is key to global grassland carbon sequestration potential

Staddon, Philip L. ORCID: 0000-0002-7968-3179 and Faghihinia, Maede (2021) Grazing intensity is key to global grassland carbon sequestration potential. Sustainable Environment, 7 (1). p. 1895474. doi:10.1080/27658511.2021.1895474

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Abstract

Grasslands are coming under ever-increasing pressure worldwide. Many grasslands are degraded due to overgrazing and inappropriate land management. This is impacting belowground biology and soil biological processes. One aspect that deserves far greater attention is the intensity of grazing and how this impacts grassland soil ecosystems. Grazing intensity impacts soil organisms including their diversity and activity, and the soil carbon cycle. However, environmental characteristics determine in part the effects of grazing intensity on soil processes. In addition, many questions remain to be answered in relation to the type of livestock and grazing regime. Only with a fuller understanding of the impacts of grazing on the soil ecosystem will it be possible to advise farmers and land managers on optimal grazing choices for a sustainable future.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Environmental change; Grazing intensity; Livestock density; Soil biology; Soil carbon
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General) > S589.75 Agriculture and the environment
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture > SB183 Field crops including cereals, forage, grasses, legumes, root crops, sugar plants, textile plants
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > Countryside and Community Research Institute
Research Priority Areas: Environmental Dynamics & Governance
Depositing User: Ella Rowe
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2021 16:04
Last Modified: 27 Apr 2021 16:15
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/9606

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