Increased variability of lap speeds: differentiating medalists and nonmedalists in middle-distance running and swimming events

Mytton, G. J., Archer, D. T., Turner, Louise A ORCID: 0000-0002-0153-7075, Skorski, S., Renfree, A., Thompson, K. G. and St. Clair Gibson, A. (2015) Increased variability of lap speeds: differentiating medalists and nonmedalists in middle-distance running and swimming events. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 10 (3). pp. 369-373. doi:10.1123/ijspp.2014-0207

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Previous literature has presented pacing data of groups of competition finalists. The aim of this study was to analyze the pacing patterns displayed by medalists and nonmedalists in international competitive 400-m swimming and 1500-m running finals. METHODS: Split times were collected from 48 swimming finalists (four 100-m laps) and 60 running finalists (4 laps) in international competitions from 2004 to 2012. Using a cross-sectional design, lap speeds were normalized to whole-race speed and compared to identify variations of pace between groups of medalists and nonmedalists. Lap-speed variations relative to the gold medalist were compared for the whole field. RESULTS: In 400-m swimming the medalist group demonstrated greater variation in speed than the nonmedalist group, being relatively faster in the final lap (P < .001; moderate effect) and slower in laps 1 (P = .03; moderate effect) and 2 (P > .001; moderate effect). There were also greater variations of pace in the 1500-m running medalist group than in the nonmedalist group, with a relatively faster final lap (P = .03; moderate effect) and slower second lap (P = .01; small effect). Swimming gold medalists were relatively faster than all other finalists in lap 4 (P = .04), and running gold medalists were relatively faster than the 5th- to 12th-placed athletes in the final lap (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: Athletes who win medals in 1500-m running and 400-m swimming competitions show different pacing patterns than nonmedalists. End-spurt-speed increases are greater with medalists, who demonstrate a slower relative speed in the early part of races but a faster speed during the final part of races than nonmedalists.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sports Performance; Pacing; Competitive Behaviour
Related URLs:
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Sport and Exercise > Applied Sport & Exercise Sciences
Research Priority Areas: Sport, Exercise, Health & Wellbeing
Depositing User: Kate Greenaway
Date Deposited: 07 Feb 2020 10:43
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2020 15:49
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/8108

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