Urban Futures 3

Buck, David N ORCID: 0000-0002-8656-2017 and Molinari, Carla ORCID: 0000-0002-1892-6325 (2019) Urban Futures 3. Urban Futures . University of Gloucestershire.

[img]
Preview
Text (Urban Futures 3 Conference Proceedings)
FINAL UF3 PDF for distribution.pdf - Published Version
Available under License All Rights Reserved.

Download (116MB) | Preview

Abstract

Urban Futures 3: What about Landscape? was part of our annual activities in landscape and architecture research within the School of Art and Design. It celebrated the broadening possibilities for this expanding but seemingly ambiguous field of landscape within current design discourse. This conference built upon our research symposium in Urban Futures 1: Researching the Territory Between Space, Heritage, Living and Environment in the 21st Century – which examined the landscape of future cities from both philosophical and practical perspectives. As Professor Jonathan Hill has noted, inherent in the original Italian word for design, disegno, was a duality suggesting both the drawing of a line on paper as well as the drawing forth of an idea. We took this dual connotation as making explicit the close relationship between thought and practice which underpins our collective design research interests. The symposium brought together academics from Asia and the UK, with invitees from English government agencies and private organisations. In Urban Futures 2: Researching the Territory Between Urbanity and Rurality, we again collaborated with Professor Janet Dwyer and the university’s Countryside and Community Research Institute, and invitees from Asia, to explore the growing importance and possibilities of the peri-urban hinterland. Drawing back to Lefebvre’s 1970 publication on the erasure of the longheld distinction between the country and city, we examined the shared challenges of these unique landscapes. For What About Landscape? we considered the landscape from multiple perspectives, drawing upon: its historic relationship to its depiction; its relationship to the human action of modelling the urban or natural environment; and its creation of new specific aesthetic visions, experiences or characters. But what is happening now? How has the concept of landscape been changing? What is the landscape of the present? And what about our and its future? Cities are constantly growing, overloaded by images and inputs; the areas between urban and rural environments are left to change without clear visions; the relationships between human beings and nature are always more hidden and complicated; natural areas are disappearing or have been transformed in protected untouchable open-air museums; even sustainability itself seems at times to already be an old-fashioned trend while the rhythm of our life is increasing constantly. In this context, what is the new meaning of landscape and how are human beings creating new relationships with nature? As the Catalan poet Antonio Machado noted, ‘there are no paths, paths are made by walking’ and this conference examined these questions: defining the landscape as social, economic, political, artistic, design, historic and theoretical products of its own era; and identifying its transformations, from the past to the future. Trying to focus on the concept of landscape broadly, the conference produced interdisciplinary and innovative discussions related to this expansive topic. Within this framework, the conference welcomed international researchers – from academic and professional environments – whose research is related to the concept of landscape, and who so generously wanted to contribute their expertise to this compendium of possibilities for its future. We warmly welcome our contributors included in these proceedingUrban Futures 3: What about Landscape? was part of our annual activities in landscape and architecture research within the School of Art and Design. It celebrated the broadening possibilities for this expanding but seemingly ambiguous field of landscape within current design discourse. This conference built upon our research symposium in Urban Futures 1: Researching the Territory Between Space, Heritage, Living and Environment in the 21st Century – which examined the landscape of future cities from both philosophical and practical perspectives. As Professor Jonathan Hill has noted, inherent in the original Italian word for design, disegno, was a duality suggesting both the drawing of a line on paper as well as the drawing forth of an idea. We took this dual connotation as making explicit the close relationship between thought and practice which underpins our collective design research interests. The symposium brought together academics from Asia and the UK, with invitees from English government agencies and private organisations. In Urban Futures 2: Researching the Territory Between Urbanity and Rurality, we again collaborated with Professor Janet Dwyer and the university’s Countryside and Community Research Institute, and invitees from Asia, to explore the growing importance and possibilities of the peri-urban hinterland. Drawing back to Lefebvre’s 1970 publication on the erasure of the longheld distinction between the country and city, we examined the shared challenges of these unique landscapes. For What About Landscape? we considered the landscape from multiple perspectives, drawing upon: its historic relationship to its depiction; its relationship to the human action of modelling the urban or natural environment; and its creation of new specific aesthetic visions, experiences or characters. But what is happening now? How has the concept of landscape been changing? What is the landscape of the present? And what about our and its future? Cities are constantly growing, overloaded by images and inputs; the areas between urban and rural environments are left to change without clear visions; the relationships between human beings and nature are always more hidden and complicated; natural areas are disappearing or have been transformed in protected untouchable open-air museums; even sustainability itself seems at times to already be an old-fashioned trend while the rhythm of our life is increasing constantly. In this context, what is the new meaning of landscape and how are human beings creating new relationships with nature? As the Catalan poet Antonio Machado noted, ‘there are no paths, paths are made by walking’ and this conference examined these questions: defining the landscape as social, economic, political, artistic, design, historic and theoretical products of its own era; and identifying its transformations, from the past to the future. Trying to focus on the concept of landscape broadly, the conference produced interdisciplinary and innovative discussions related to this expansive topic. Within this framework, the conference welcomed international researchers – from academic and professional environments – whose research is related to the concept of landscape, and who so generously wanted to contribute their expertise to this compendium of possibilities for its future. We warmly welcome our contributors included in these proceeding

Item Type: Book
Related URLs:
Subjects: N Fine Arts > NA Architecture > NA9000 Aesthetics of cities. City planning and beautifying.
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Arts > Design
Research Priority Areas: Being Human - Past, Present & Future
Creative Practice as Research
Depositing User: David Buck
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2019 10:45
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2019 11:12
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/7101

University Staff: Request a correction | Repository Editors: Update this record

University Of Gloucestershire

Bookmark and Share

Find Us On Social Media:

Social Media Icons Facebook Twitter Google+ YouTube Pinterest Linkedin

Other University Web Sites

University of Gloucestershire, The Park, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, GL50 2RH. Telephone +44 (0)844 8010001.