Effects of acute prolonged sitting on cerebral perfusion and executive function in young adults: a randomized cross-over trial

Stoner, Lee, Willey, Quentin, Evans, William S, Burnet, Kathryn, Credeur, Daniel, Fryer, Simon M and Hanson, Erik D (2019) Effects of acute prolonged sitting on cerebral perfusion and executive function in young adults: a randomized cross-over trial. Psychophysiology. ISSN 0048-5772 (In Press)

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Abstract

Exposure to acute prolonged sitting reportedly leads to decreased cerebral blood flow. However, it is unclear whether this exposure translates to decreased cerebral perfusion and executive function, or whether simple strategies to break-up sitting can maintain cerebral perfusion and executive function. This study sought to answer two questions: in young, healthy adults (i) does prolonged (3 h) sitting lead to decreased cerebral perfusion and executive function? and (ii) does breaking-up prolonged sitting, using intermittent calf raise exercises, prevent changes in cerebral perfusion and executive function? Twenty young, healthy participants (21.7 [2.5] y, 70% F, 25.5 [6.1] kg/m2) were randomized to: 3 h sitting with 10 calf raises every 10 min (CALF), and 3 h sitting without calf intermittent calf raises (CON). Prefrontal cortex perfusion was assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor total hemoglobin (tHB) concentration and tissue saturation index (TSI, oxygenated hemoglobin). Executive function was assessed using the Stroop Word and Color Tasks. Following 3 h sitting, tHb was significantly lower in CALF vs. CON (-2.1 μM, 95% CI: -3.1, -1.1). TSI was not significantly different between conditions (P = .667). Word (1.6 ms, 95% CI: 0.7, 2.5) and Color (1.3 ms, 95% CI: -0.2, 2.8) completion times were longer (worse) for CALF compared to CON. In conclusion, calf raises decreased both cerebral perfusion and executive function. Simple strategies, such as fidgeting or calf raises, which have been reported to preserve vascular function in the legs, appear not to be sufficient enough to benefit cerebral perfusion or executive function.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cognition; Near infra-red spectroscopy; Oxygenation; Sedentary; Total hemoglobin; Inactivity
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Sport and Exercise > Applied Sport & Exercise Sciences
Research Priority Areas: Sport, Exercise, Health & Wellbeing
Depositing User: Susan Turner
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2019 15:43
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2019 15:45
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/7081

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