Are there 12 steps to better management? How the spiritual programme of Alcoholics Anonymous may influence management performance evaluated through general management competencies.

Eccles, Thomas B (2013) Are there 12 steps to better management? How the spiritual programme of Alcoholics Anonymous may influence management performance evaluated through general management competencies. PhD thesis, University of Gloucestershire.

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Abstract

The 12 Step programme of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA, 2001) is a set of principles that provides a way of life for those that follow it and is based upon a ‘spiritual awakening’ (AA, 2001 pp59-60). The thesis is the first to examine how managers who follow this spiritual programme apply it in their organisational role through general management competencies (New, 1996). This mixed method, phenomenology-led research is placed within a social constructionist setting. A comprehensive and wide ranging literature review was conducted. The data was generated using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (Smith, 1996), the Integrated Spiritual Intelligence Scale (Amram and Dyer, 2007) and Workplace Observation (Lucia and Lepsinger, 1999). The findings explain psychological antecedents, mechanisms and pathways that inform the sample of AA managers in their work role. The discussion identifies relationships with existing efficacious management styles and concepts. Areas of heuristic value for future research are identified. These areas include exploring the 12 Steps specifically as antecedents to emotional intelligence (Payne, 1985) and strengthening the statistical validity of instruments to measure humility and honesty in context of spirituality. Limitations of this research are also identified and discussed and important reservations about the concept and constructs of spiritual intelligence (Zohar, 1997) are raised. In conclusion, the 12 Step spiritual programme was found to be the primary influence in how the sample conduct their organisational management function. The research calls for human resource processes to re-consider how those who have adopted successful recovery techniques to overcome personal crises such as dependency issues are viewed and argues that they should be more highly valued by organisations as such experiences help develop management competencies.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Thesis Advisors:
Thesis AdvisorEmailURL
Biggs, Daviddbiggs@glos.ac.ukhttp://www.glos.ac.uk/faculties-and-schools/natural-and-social-sciences/staff-profiles/pages/s2104437-david-biggs.aspx
Parrish, Margaretemparrish@glos.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Uncontrolled Keywords: Alcoholics Anonymous; management competencies; spiritual intelligence; business psychology; humble management; spirituality at work
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Natural & Social Sciences
Depositing User: Susan Turner
Date Deposited: 14 May 2014 13:28
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2016 15:34
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/663

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