The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor.

Fryer, Simon M, Stone, Keeron J, Dickson, Tabitha, Wilhelmsen, Andrew, Cowen, Daniel, Faulkner, James, Lambrick, Danielle M and Stoner, Lee (2018) The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor. Journal of Sports Sciences. ISSN 0264-0414 (In Press)

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6239 Fryer, S (2018) The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor.pdf - Accepted Version
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Abstract

Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O2), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14% FiO2 ~3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58%) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO2·min-1·100g-1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69%) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min-1·100ml-1 per week (95% CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI].”
Uncontrolled Keywords: Hypoxic Training; Hypoxemia; Perfusion; Near -Infrared Spectroscopy
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports > GV0712 Athletic contests. Sports events
Q Science > QM Human anatomy
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Sport and Exercise
Research Priority Areas: Sport, Exercise, Health & Wellbeing
Depositing User: Kate Greenaway
Date Deposited: 27 Nov 2018 11:33
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2018 19:27
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/6239

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