Community-based, Bionic Leg Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Chronic Stroke: Clinical Trial Protocol

Wright, A. and Stone, Keeron J and Lambrick, Danielle M and Fryer, Simon M and Stoner, Lee and Tasker, E. and Jobson, S. and Smith, G. and Batten, J. and Batey, J. and Hudson, V. and Hobbs, H. and Faulkner, James (2017) Community-based, Bionic Leg Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Chronic Stroke: Clinical Trial Protocol. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. ISSN 1052-3057 (In Press)

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Abstract

Stroke is a major global health problem whereby many survivors have unmet needs concerning mobility during recovery. As such, the use of robotic assisted devices (i.e., a bionic leg) within a community-setting may be an important adjunct to normal physiotherapy in chronic stroke survivors. This study will be a dual-centre, randomized, parallel group clinical trial to investigate the impact of a community based, training program using a bionic leg on biomechanical, cardiovascular and functional outcomes in stroke survivors. Following a baseline assessment which will assess gait, postural sway, vascular health (blood pressure, arterial stiffness) and functional outcomes (6-minute walk), participants will be randomized to a 10-week program group, incorporating either: i) physiotherapy plus community-based bionic leg training program, ii) physiotherapy only, or iii) usual care control. The training program will involve participants engaging in a minimum of 1 hour per day of bionic leg activities at home. Follow up assessment, identical to baseline, will occur after 10-weeks, 3 and 12 months post intervention. Given the practical implications of the study, the clinical significance of using the bionic leg will be assessed for each outcome variable. The potential improvements in gait, balance, vascular health and functional status may have a meaningful impact on patients’ quality of life. The integration of robotic devices within home-based rehabilitation programs may prove to be a cost effective, practical and beneficial resource for stroke survivors.

Item Type: Article
Article Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Robotic assisted; Stroke survivors; Walking; Gait; Blood pressure
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology > RM695 Physical medicine. physical therapy including massage, exercise, occupational therapy, hydrotherapy, phototherapy, radiotherapy, thermotherapy, electrotherapy
Divisions: Schools and Research Institutes > School of Sport & Exercise > Sport and Exercise
Research Priority Areas: Sport, Exercise, Health & Wellbeing
Depositing User: Susan Turner
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2017 16:06
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2017 04:05
URI: http://eprints.glos.ac.uk/id/eprint/4998

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